Broadway+Thresher: A Digital Magazine at the Crossroads
2013-2014

 


Broadway+Thresher: A Digital Magazine at the Crossroads. Starting in 2013, Broadway+Thresher was a digital magazine published bi-monthly by David Gobeli.
Every day, city dwellers are choosing to transport their lives from urban centers to more rural landscapes. These communities are becoming increasingly infused with new perspectives, creating unique opportunities for blending urban innovations with rural traditions. Broadway+Thresher chronicled these journeys; highlighting the stories of local artisans, farmers, artists, and the design elements that furnish their inspiration.
Content is from the site's 2012 - 2014 archived pages providing a brief peak at what the site  with its blog and the magazine offered its readers.

 

Broadway+Thresher will focus on individuals, couples, and families expressing their identity as artists, trendsetters and innovators living boldly and without compromise in non-urban settings, bringing the diversity and dynamism that has been traditionally the province of the city to rural America and beyond. Not only will Broadway+Thresher focus on the rural lifestyle, but also the cutting edge of architecture, art, food and artisanal manufacturing and the untold stories of the people who have made it possible. The magazine will highlight both people and product, but will never lose sight of the aesthetics and artistry that are central to the articulation of the sophisticated rural perspective.

WELCOME!

 

We're thrilled you've chosen to come and take a look at our new blog. We've been working hard for months, compiling a group of amazing professionals, experts in their profession, and working on the best possible product to offer you, our reader. Have fun exploring our site, and let us know what you think. Our blog will be updated daily, so please check back as often as possible, and sign up to receive updates in our "Subscribe" section. Also, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest to see new and exciting content. If you'd like to share something on Pinterest that you've seen on our site, just click on the "share" button to the left of each blog post.

We have been fortunate to find dedicated people across the country who have volunteered their time and talents for Broadway+Thresher. While there are countless lifestyle magazines on the news stand today, none have taken the time to explore the rich diversity of our rural areas, and the influence urban migration has had on them. Family artisans, practicing the craft of their forefathers, can now communicate with countless folks and source new, exciting materials from around the world. As their perspective grows, so to do their products and their talents. 

Broadway+Thresher will focus on individuals, couples, and families expressing their identity as artists, trendsetters and innovators living boldly and without compromise in non-urban settings, bringing the diversity and dynamism that has been traditionally the province of the city to rural America and beyond. Not only will Broadway+Thresher focus on the rural lifestyle, but also the cutting edge of architecture, art, food and artisanal manufacturing and the untold stories of the people who have made it possible. The magazine will highlight both people and product, but will never lose sight of the aesthetics and artistry that are central to the articulation of the sophisticated rural perspective.

Thanks for spending some time with us!

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~

And thank you for creating this trendy, delightful digital magazine.

I was turned on to Broadway+Thresher which I initially thought sounded like a comedy duo similar to the comedy magic duo, Penn & Teller when I was planning a trip to Hawaii with my partner to celebrate our tenth wedding anniversay. I had decided upon the Aina Nalu rentals in Lahaina on Maui. The historic town of Lahaina was once the capital of the Kingdom of Hawaii and the center of the global whaling industry. It's the largest community in West Maui, now known as a tropical getaway with a little something for everyone. Front Street, which is the town's main street ,offers everything from fine art galleries, and restaurants, to shopping. What I really wanted to see was the huge Banyan Tree (Maui's oldest living tree) in the town square. I excitedly called my partner and said, I have the perfect rental. It's a studio condo is on the 5th floor of the Lahaina Shores Beach Resort with amazing views. He's response was, "That's nice." What a tepid response. I knew that he must be reading something which was grabbing his attention. Turns out it was the first issue of Broadway+Thresher. I also got hooked on the magazine, so I can't really complain. And he did become as excited as I was when he saw the pictures of the condo. We returned to Maui this year to celebrate our 15th wedding anniversary. I wish that I could say I am still reading Broadway+Thresher, but the magazine eventually folded. I will miss it, but I did thoroughly enjoy every issue that was published. Great articles, beautiful photographs.

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DAVID GOBELI, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Like many country boys, David Gobeli dreamed of life in the big city, complete with his name in lights, fancy parties, and the rush of a city that never slows down. Art, architecture, and the culture of urban environments always drew him to the way of life that he felt he was missing while surrounded by cow pastures and the rolling hills of south central Wisconsin. Life took him to the city and after experiencing the urban flair, discovered that his home, and heart, belonged to a more pastoral life.

Now back in Madison, Wisconsin, living with his partner and their dog, Basil, he has found the perfect mix of country hospitality, graciousness, and urban culture. It is a city stocked with farmers markets, local food co-ops, and a dairy farm mere blocks from downtown, while also catering to artists, designers, and foodies, Madison has come to represent the best of both worlds and, to David, embodies the great lifestyle that is Broadway+Thresher.

David believes that rural life need not be pigeonholed into one style or genre, and with the influx of urban refugees flocking to the countryside, the landscape is evolving into a more sophisticated and inclusive environment. Artists are no longer delegated to the city, restaurants are going directly to the farmers that produce the food, and cutting edge architecture is developing on the back forty. Broadway+Thresher celebrates the innovation of these artisans and their products, and aims to shine a light on the growing trend of the rural sophisticate.

ANDREW KOHN, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Andrew lives in Granville, Ohio with his partner, Don, 3 dogs, 6 cats, llamas, goats, sheep, and numerous other farm animals. In 2010, Andrew was working in Washington, D.C., a writer at The White House. Tired of city life, and ready for a more bucolic setting, the family packed up and moved into a house built in 1850, where they opened Orchard House Bed and Breakfast. Andrew has traded his commute for cleaning up in the barn, has learned how to give medical shots to de-worm goats, and finds the aisles of Whole Foods alive in his garden.

Having traveled around the world, from Madagascar to Argentina to China, Andrew has seen first hand the amazing art and craftsmanship so many cultures have to offer. From the hills of Appalachia to the small villages of Scotland, artisans are continuing the practices of their forefathers, striving not to mass market products for immense wealth, but to produce items of the highest quality and integrity. 

While in law school in Vermont, Andrew saw how a small, rural town can be transformed by an influx of urban influences. Communities are being continually transformed as towns marry long held traditions with new points-of-view. Broadway+Thresher will chronicle these relationships, celebrating these communities, while also highlighting those artisans thriving as they grow and adapt to our ever-changing world. After all, if Andrew can learn the art of canning and win Best of Show with his first ever jam recipe at the Ohio State Fair, anything is possible!  

 

AND THE REST OF THE TEAM...

Executive Editor: Dan Long

Editorial Board: Amy Hamilton and Michael Kennedy

Photography Editor: Rachel Joy Baransi

Fashion Editor: Ruth Coffey

Menswear Contributor: Lee Kirkpatrick

Food Editor: Mark Nickerson 

Lifestyle Contributor: Caitlin Terry

Lifestyle Editor: Nicole McGrew

Contributing Editor, Lifestyle: Kristofer Bowman

Contributing Editor, Lifestyle: Brice Corder

Contributing Editor, Lifestyle and Design: Emily Blitzer

Music Editor: Meredith Peters

Farm+Garden Editor: Anton Sarossy-Christon

Farm+Garden Contributor: Deven Rittenhouse

Farm+Garden Contributor: Jenna Kelly-Landes

Fine Arts Editor: Anne Sherwood Pundyk

Technical Advisor: Donald Jones

Design Consultant: Jodi Melfi

Mixologist in Residence: Emily George

Contributing Editors include Amy Patterson, Jackie Alpers, Amy Parrish, Tracey Lewis, Rita Finn, Susan King, and Kim Stryker.

 



 

OUR STORY

The old street sign for W. Broadway and Thresher in Granville, Ohio.

The idea behind Broadway+Thresher came long before the name. David and Andrew met while both were working for another periodical. Jointly, they traveled around central Ohio to attend events and planned stories for future issues. After many conversations over delicious foods and gorgeous wines, they decided to start their own publication. Both having lived in urban and rural environments, they wanted to highlight the transition many communities are currently facing; chronicling urban influences on the rural aesthetic.

Broadway+Thresher is actually a crossroads in the village of Granville, Ohio. One day, while cruising an antique mall, Andrew found the old street sign for this intersection. It was David, looking at a picture of the sign, who declared it the perfect name for our magazine. Not only does the name represent a wonderful small town in the heartland of America, it also represents the urban (in Broadway) and the rural (in Thresher) at a crossroads.

We have been fortunate to find dedicated people across the country who have volunteered their time and talents for Broadway+Thresher. While there are countless lifestyle magazines on the news stand today, none have taken the time to explore the rich diversity of our rural areas, and the influence urban migration has had on them. Family artisans, practicing the craft of their forefathers, can now communicate with countless folks and source new, exciting materials from around the world. As their perspective grows, so to do their products and their talents.

Broadway+Thresher will focus on individuals, couples, and families expressing their identity as artists, trendsetters and innovators living boldly and without compromise in non-urban settings, bringing the diversity and dynamism that has been traditionally the province of the city to rural America and beyond. Not only will Broadway+Thresher focus on the rural lifestyle, but also the cutting edge of architecture, art, food and artisanal manufacturing and the untold stories of the people who have made it possible. The magazine will highlight both people and product, but will never lose sight of the aesthetics and artistry that are central to the articulation of the sophisticated rural perspective.

 



 

Broadway+Thresher: Issue 1 Now Available!

Sections

  • Farm+Garden
  • Fashion
  • Food+Drink
  • Journal
  • Lifestyle
  • Music+Art
  • Snapshots
  • Celebrate

 

Food+Drink



Broadway+Thresher presents the Bee's Knees Cocktail featuring Gambier Gold honey
2 ounce gin
1 ounce honey syrup
1 ounce lemon juice
Shake with ice and strain
Thank you to Emily George of Bella and DaVinci Lounge in Granville, Ohio.

 

 



Broadway+Thresher presents the Penicillin cocktail featuring Gambier Gold honey
2 slices peeled ginger
1 ounce honey Syrup
1 oz fresh lemon juice
2 ounce blended scotch
1/4 ounce Islay scotch
lemon peel

Thank you to Emily M George, Bartender's Burden of Proof
Eric George, Videography

 

Farm+Garden

Winter Wonderland [F+G]

December 12, 2013 by Andrew Kohn
Text and images by Jenna Kelly-Landes of Bee Tree Farm.

9 a.m. on a Saturday morning and it’s sleeting, the sort of weather to curl up against in a warm fleecy quilt. I imagine a city full of people yawning from sleep, just now padding into their kitchens shod in cozy socks, lazily starting a pot of coffee or frying eggs. The icy wind whips against windows that block the frigid grip of winter, the same grip that’s now found a pinprick hole in my jacket so that thin fingers of ice form against my skin. I reach back to try and cover the hole, lean forward against the hay ring with a gloved hand that immediately sticks to the ice encrusted metal, and bring my rubber boot down firmly into a pile of sludgy manure. The dull, putrid “splat” sound it creates immediately negates the hunger I’ve felt since sunrise.

So, this is farming in winter, specifically, this is farming in winter in Texas, which is the moldiest season we’ve got. Out here, the forecast fluctuates between frostbite and heatstroke within the same week. This translates into vegetation that is frozen then thawed repeatedly for weeks, creating the aura of a faint moldy funk above all the flora and fauna. Add to this a general lack of preparedness related to sub-freezing temperatures, and you’ve got one spectacularly foul-tempered farmer. Yet the facts of a farmer’s life dictate work outdoors - all the time - despite the weather, despite the sludge, and sleet, and frozen fingers.

It is specifically because of our animals that I am compelled to trudge through the dreary days of winter. For them, the show must go on regardless of any creature comforts I might be craving. Frozen water must be thawed and fresh hay doled out to the crowds of animals alternately mooing or screaming (goats truly do scream like humans) at the fence line. No matter the temperature, the chickens will inevitably march from their roost in the coop and approach the edge of the house like an angry mob. Don’t bother trying to get around a pack of hungry chickens without bearing food. They will not let you pass

In the midst of these frigid temperatures are the impending births of so many assorted livestock and other four-legged friends. This means I’ve spent the whole of this particular winter storm crunching through a frozen pasture in the wee hours of morning, bundled in five layers of mismatched clothing including polka dotted flannels stuffed into rubber boots and a headlight strapped firmly to my head for the sole purpose of checking the business ends of the following animals: a cow, four goats, one Great Pyrenees livestock guardian dog. Winter on a farm is exactly the same work of any other season except that it is colder and dirtier.  Living with animals means that it is constant.  But it is also full with gratification. 

Today, in the 26-degree morning cold, we discovered five new babies curled against Betty, our Great Pyrenees guardian dog. There was a flurry of activity dismantling the side of a the chicken coop where she decided to deliver the babies, then a mile’s worth of jogging between house and coop to gather water and food bowls, Betty herself, and – finally – the babies. Five perfect blobs of white studded on all ends with miniature paws, their coral colored pads still tender and untouched. They squirmed and gurgled and immediately the morning frost faded. So did the throbbing headache that my headlight causes. My frozen fingers warmed. My winter-grinched heart began to thaw. New farm babies cast a golden-hued glow about every situation; a halo of hope and renewed fortitude. This is the beginning of winter, sure. But around the corner of this season is spring, and with it, more baby farm animals that will forever be the reason to endure even the dreariest depths of winter.  

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Paperwhites . . . and Vodka! [F+G]

December 06, 2013
By Anton Sarossy-Christon

Did I get your attention? I just learned a great trick to keep my Paperwhites (Narcissus papyraceus) from flopping over. It's always been a pet peeve of mine; I plant the bulbs up, water them, turn the pot every other day to keep light exposure even on all sides, and then suddenly the leaves and  flower stems grow freakishly long and the whole affair flops over. Truth be told, I've abstained from growing Paperwhites for the past few years because of this problem. Resorting to staking a potted plant is a solution but one that requires one step too many for me. That is until I read Cornell University's aptly named article 'Pickling your Paperwhites, Ginning Up Paperwhites That Don't Flop Over'. Cornell's Flower Bulb Research Program found that adding a solution of 4-6% alcohol (hard liquor or rubbing alcohol) to the water you use to water the bulbs will result in a plant that is 1/3 as tall without having any effect on the size, quality, or duration of the flowers produced. Ingenious.

Paperwhites take 2-3 weeks to flower from planting, so if you start now you'll have blooms in time for Christmas and the New Year. After potting up your bulbs, water as usual and after a week (when roots have begun to grow) switch to the 4-6% alcoholic pickling brew. Cornell has the ratios in its article here. I suggest we raise a glass to beautiful flowers and the holiday season. Happy indoor gardening

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Everyone Needs a Magic Wand! [F+G]

November 29, 2013
By Anton Sarossy-Christon
If you detect a theme in my posts lately, then you've already correctly guessed that winter has descended on my farm and the battle against frozen water has come full circle yet again. This week I'd like to share with you a product I'm calling my 'Magic Wand', because it certainly acts like one. Submersible water heaters or bucket water heaters as they're alternatively called deserve a place on every farm with electric service to the barn. Fill a bucket with water, place the heater inside, plug in, and in a few minutes you have warm water. One of the many ways I use my magic wand is to defrost water bottles. I have a small rabbitry at Terravita Farms where I raise 'American Chinchilla' rabbits, and their water bottles frequently freeze overnight. This poses no problem for my magic wand. My first task upon entering the barn is gathering up the frozen water bottles and putting them into the bucket with the submersible heater. By the time my chores are finished the bottles have defrosted! The only caveat with this product: don't forget to unplug before leaving the barn!  This heater might be just the thing to fill your favorite farmer's stocking this Christmas. Keep warm!

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Goats and Gratitude [F+G]
November 27, 2013
Text and images by Jenna Kelly-Landes of Bee Tree Farm.

‘Tis the season for thanksgiving, and I can think of no better way to celebrate then by sharing a recipe that manages to intoxicate with the flavor of farming. Nothing else captures the sweetest essence of dairy goats then cajeta, or goat milk caramel sauce; the result of a divine chemistry that occurs when goat milk is simmered down to its essential components. Cajeta has the dual benefit of creating food and also making the house smell like little pieces of heaven have fallen through the clouds and embraced the space in a gentle hug. It's a toasted, nutty, vanilla, warm, smokey breath that curls up into the crevices of the whole place and lingers for at least a day.  Dairy goats bring with them a generous amount of turmoil and entertainment at once, and if you're on the fence about owning one, I can assure you that one jar of cajeta will push your teetering decision over the edge. I have deduced, through scientific research and poll-taking, that the key to happiness can be found, not just in the final product of cajeta, but also in the long process of making the stuff.  All you really need is this: 1) goat milk 2) sugar/heat, and 3) patience.

The recipe is stupidly simple but the sauce must cook for hours if you want it whittled down to its toastiest essence of buttered, creamy, sugary perfection. One gallon of milk evaporates down to less than half and can be stored for a month in the refrigerator. If you're not in the mood for buying and milking a dairy goat (that's fair - but still recommended), then try to locate a high quality, whole goat milk, and follow these simple steps. Rinse, repeat whenever you need a little boost. Life's too short to go without cajeta.

What

-1 gallon whole goat milk
-3.5 cups of sugar
-2 tablespoons vanilla
-1 teaspoon baking soda diluted in 1/2 cup water

How
First of all, you'll notice the use of a copper pot, or cazos de cobre, in the picture. This is a Mexican copper pot traditionally used for making cajeta or candy and is an excellent kitchen tool for anything that benefits from superior heat conduction. Plus it's Pretty with a capital P. However, any heavy-bottomed pot will do just fine. Bring the milk, sugar, and vanilla to a simmer.  Remove from heat and slowly add baking soda, stirring well. The baking soda will cause the liquid to rise up and possibly boil over - sort of like the volcano you made for the science fair in elementary school. Same deal here. Once it starts to go back down, put the liquid back over low heat. Now it's a waiting game. Stir occasionally with a wooden spoon. Within an hour the milk will start to noticeably evaporate and darken.

 


Celebrate

Apple Picking: A Video [Celebrate]
November 06, 2013
David Gobeli, B+T co-Editor
Video and text by  Rachel Joy Baransi

I went apple picking with the Shaw family. They're a really beautiful and warm family, and there's a lot to be learned from them. They adopted their son, Mesay, from Ethiopia less than a month ago. The apple picking adventure was my first time meeting him and boy is he lovely. His older sister, Winnie, had been one of my best kid friends since I met her in 2010. My fantastic housemates, Chelsea & Mike, came along also. Thanks to them & Winnie for picking most of my apples while I held my camera. What a great day at Lynd's Fruit Farm.

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Cake Style [Celebrate]

November 03, 2013 byAndrew Kohn
Wedding cakes have truly evolved into personal expressions of the bride and groom's style. No longer are we just seeing white cakes, one on top of the other, with icing, and a traditional topper. Today, cakes are only limited by your imagination. Now if only at the reception the slices could be a little bigger!

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"I Do..." Vintage Style [Celebrate]

October 06, 2013  byAndrew Kohn
Text by Susan King with images provided by Jenna Beougher.

Stylish, personal, and very, very vintage. The 2013 wedding of Brittany Martz and Brad Brenneman was all of these [with an emphasis on vintage!]

The bride repaired and wore a family heirloom necklace that was over 100
years old.

The couple’s country-chic outdoor ceremony took place at the picturesque Johnny Appleseed Farm Park near Lima, Ohio. A modern, yet rustic barn and adjacent tent served as the couple’s reception site and brimmed with vintage treasures. Eschewing predictable matchy-matchy table décor, the bride created unique vignettes of vintage décor. The tables featured collected and carefully curated assemblage of bird cages, old cameras, classic hard-sided suitcases, vintage hats, fans and lanterns. Buckeye Blooms, a local flower farm and florist, designed large bouquets in unconventional vessels including tea pots, apothecary bottles, gravy boats and lunch boxes to complete the look.

The two sweethearts also shared another love: sweets. Not satisfied with a simple wedding cake, the couple created an entire dessert section of the reception site.  Shabby chic buffets, dressers and cabinets lined one entire wall of the barn to serve as stations for cupcakes, cookies, pies, cake, candy, and popcorn. Now THAT is sweet!

Behind the scenes of a vintage wedding

So, what goes into designing and decorating vintage wedding for 350+ guests? Bride Brittany shares some of her secrets of making her vintage vision a reality. 

“From the day we were engaged, we were on the hunt for all things vintage to include along with my own collection. We scoured antique shops, garage sales and thrift stores.  The wedding actually took two and a half days to set up. We brought in so much furniture, china and vintage accessories that we had to borrow a trailer and truck and it had to be filled and loaded several times. To cut down on the time, I had practiced setting up all of the furniture displays ahead of time, photographed them and boxed them in labeled boxes."

“The biggest chore was finding enough mismatched china to use for our 370 guests.  We were looking for dinner plates, salad plates/bowls, and dessert plates. We traveled two hours away to sift through tubs of plates leftover from a wedding that we’d heard about at a flea market the year before. The result of that trip, however, did not yield enough plates. My mother and several family friends and relatives were then on a mission scavenging at several Goodwill and thrift stores until we came up with enough china to use for all our guests."

So what’s a girl to do with so much vintage furniture after the big day?  Start a rental company, of course!  Brittany recently started a small business, Once Upon A Time Vintage Rentals and Décor. 

+++

Blooms with Bachelorettes [Celebrate]

October 03, 2013  byAndrew Kohn
Seeking a creative and alternative to a traditional boozy bachelorette party at a bar, April Beach surprised her future sister-in-law, Laura, with a flower party.   The bride-to-be and her bridesmaids traveled to Buckeye Blooms, a flower farm near Lima, Ohio to bond as a group and learn the basics of floral design.

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A Wedding in the Woods [Celebrate]

June 19, 2013  byAndrew Kohn
We love when conventional events are held in unconventional locations. Events, and specifically weddings, offer endless opportunities for creativity and artistry to bloom. Outside of the traditional church, wedding ceremonies can be held in open fields, in amazing barns or unique structures, or even inside a forest.

 



 

Issue 2

 



 

Issue 3

 



B+T Issue 3 Preview

 



Issue 4

 



 

Issue 5 IS HERE!

GREENFIRE FARMS, AN ISSUE 5 SNEAK PEAK... [F+G]

April 19, 2014

Text by Anton Sarossy-Christon

Here's another sneak peak of an article you'll find in Issue 5 of B+T.

"I find an unfortunate irony in the homophones foul and fowl. Though fowl do have the knack to produce foul offerings at unpropitious times—I’m worried about the outcome of my four year old son’s show-and-tell—the word better describes a group of the most beautifully feathered domesticated poultry. Fowl, if they were traded on the stock market, have been experiencing a decidedly bullish rise in popularity. According to Mother Nature Network, celebrities from Jennifer Anniston, Reese Witherspoon, Martha Stewart, to Chevy Chase have coops and ponds full of chickens, turkeys, ducks, and geese. The most pedigreed proponent of organic farming, Prince Charles, raises chickens and promotes products made from their eggs (among many others) through his popular organic food and drink brand Duchy Originals. Fowl: their day has dawned, and that should give them something to crow, gobble, quack, and honk about."

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A FAVORITE GARDENING TOOL [F+G]

April 13, 2014

Text by Anton Sarossy-Christon

As the weather warms up, the soil follows suit and weeds aren't far behind. I finished weeding my garlic bed this afternoon reflexively reaching for my favorite weeding tool, unused since last fall: the stirrup hoe. This simple tool employs an oscillating dual-sharpened  head attached to a handle--more elaborate models add wheels and a second handle. By applying light pressure and moving the head back and forth across the soil's surface, weeds are decapitated at soil level by the thousands (satisfying!). Minimal effort is needed to clear large swaths of the garden from weeds in very little time. If used as part of a weekly weeding regimen, even perennial weeds, such as Canada Thistle, can eventually be completely eradicated from the garden. The key to using the stirrup hoe is to use it when weeds are just beginning to emerge and continuing its use on a weekly or biweekly schedule. The other tip: sharpen the cutting surfaces after each use, doing so will ensure continued quick, clean cuts. Stirrup hoes are available in three widths: 3",5", and 7", and can be found at most big box home improvement stores, local garden centers, and online retailers. Pick one up and get your weeds under control before they control your garden!

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CHIT POTATOES FOR BIGGER YIELDS [F+G]>

April 05, 2014

Text by Anton Sarossy-Christon

To chit potatoes is to pre-sprout them in advance of planting outside. Studies have shown that chitted potatoes have higher yields than those planted without first chitting. This is about the time of year you should be thinking about the kinds of potatoes you'll be growing in your garden, and after making that decision and subsequently ordering or bringing those potatoes home, you'll need to plan for the next step. To chit your potatoes, place them on a tray, screen, or shelf and arrange them so that the part of the potato with the most eyes (the little depressions on the surface of the potato from which the shoots will eventually grow) is facing up toward the light. You can forget about them until the time you normally plant them in the ground which can be as early as two weeks before your last frost date or when the soil has reached 50 degrees--it takes 3-4 weeks for the sprouts to start growing so plan with this in mind. When the time comes, plant them as usual and at harvest you'll reap the benefits of first having chitted your potatoes!

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A HOME FOR A GNOME [F+G]

April 01, 2014

There are a lot of things from the 70's and 80's that are just so garish that considering placing them either in your home or garden would be a travesty. While everyone has their own style, and almost anything can work when placed in just the right spot, there are things I see that just scream, "NO!" That weird shag rug or the plastic unicorn thingamabob I saw during a recent trip to an antique store are just a couple of the crazy things that have given me nightmares. 

But, and I might be a bit alone in this, give me the outdoor decor of those decades and I'll be a happy gardener. To me, nothing cheers up a quaint little garden like some vintage gnomes--the more the better. I'm seriously on my way to become, not a crazy cat lady, but a crazy gnome lady. As I age (still a sprite young man of 32) I seem to be collecting more and more pieces. 

Gnomes sleeping, gnomes with wheel barrows, gnomes with axes and shovels and hoes and flowers. Gnomes that are planters, gnomes that aren't anything but gnomes--easily tucked among flowers and vegetables. 

I've even started branching out to other items from the era: ceramic fox planters, and duck planters and squirrel planters. If it's an animal and a planter it'll end up in my shopping basket. 

How about you? Is there anything you are collecting for garden decor? Do you, like me, gravitate to the whimsical or more to the ornate? Do you bypass garden decor all together and rely on the simple beauty of plants? I'd love to hear your outdoor decorating weakness. Leave your comments below. 

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THE 10 BEST ANIMALS FOR YOUR FARM, IN ORDER [F+G]

March 30, 2014

I can already see you're getting upset. You're saying, "How is it even possible someone can rate farm animals? They're all so cute and wonderful!" Well, that's true. And then it certainly isn't. Some animals are friendly, some produce useful products, and some just make no sense. Before you send me hateful emails, this is only my interpretation. I'm just one farmer who owns each of the animals on this list, and can speak solely to my observations. (But, in the end, you know I'm right.)

Did I leave someone off the list? Please leave a comment and let me know. It's a big barnyard out there and sometimes mistakes are made. Also, do you own a specific breed of an animal listed below that you particularly love? Please share with the group.

#10 - The Horse. Don't hate me. I just don't like horses (and parrots). Any animal where you can see the whites of their eyes makes me uncomfortable - like they're plotting something. I've only ever ridden a horse once, and we both didn't seem to enjoy the experience. If you're a horse person, it's o.k., I just don't get it. But let's be honest, they're expensive and time consuming. Darn pretty in the field, darn hard on the bank account.

#9 - Sheep. (Image via http://www.minilivestock.com) Sheep are dumb. Cute? Sure. Sometimes downright beautiful. But they certainly don't fit into the "cuddly" category of the farm. The only friendly ones are the bottle-raised babies, and they just want food. They're lucky to have made the list - and it's only because of the wool they produce. Visiting a farm can be fun, and hearing their "bahhs" is a special experience - but be sure, it's cute for 5 minutes, and not a lifetime. Sheep farmers, in my opinion, could easily withstand Chinese water torture if they put up with a couple hundred sheep screaming day-in, day-out.

#8 - Pigs. Smart, not too dirty, and constantly sleepy, pigs make a great addition to the farm. Their only drawback is their digging. But they eat almost anything - they're a natural compost machine. They also answer to their name and make cute snorting sounds. I wouldn't want a million of them, but two or three is just fine.

#7 - Alpaca. Both cute and ugly, nice and stand-offish, alpaca are relatively easy to care for. They also produce a wonderful wool product. They do have have some medical issues, and if sick, it's often too late to save them. Ownership can bring tax relief and the industry can, perhaps, be considered a pyramid scheme as the alpaca cost is for fiber, but the fiber itself doesn't bring a lot of money - the offspring do. Rescue a few unregistered ones looking for a good home. Warning: the males can be persistent in the springtime.

#6 - Rabbits. (Image via http://www.squeeable.com) Easy, easy, easy to care for. They can live outside in a hutch that's very manageable, and eat very little compared to the others on this list. The one drawback is, when looking at them in their hutch, you envision them running on the grass and scampering across the open fields. To help cure your guilt, build them a run, where they can frolic in the grass but not escape. And remember to brush them. And cut their nails. And feed them a carrot every now and again.

#6 - Rabbits. (Image via http://www.squeeable.com) Easy, easy, easy to care for. They can live outside in a hutch that's very manageable, and eat very little compared to the others on this list. The one drawback is, when looking at them in their hutch, you envision them running on the grass and scampering across the open fields. To help cure your guilt, build them a run, where they can frolic in the grass but not escape. And remember to brush them. And cut their nails. And feed them a carrot every now and again.

#5 - Cats. (Image via http://www.cutestpaw.com) This is a no-brainer. They're only number five on the list because barn cats can, in my experience, be super mean or overly affectionate. We tried to start some kittens in the barn once, but the vet suggested we leave something for them to escape the raccoons and they quickly became indoor cats. For some reason, when real life happens to our cats and dogs on the farm it's sometimes the hardest to handle.

#4 - Chickens. Every farm needs a chicken, or five. These birds give you the quintessential farm feeling. And they produce eggs. And eat bugs. The reason chickens aren't number one on this list is because so many people now have coops in urban and suburban areas that they may not be considered strictly "farm" animals anymore. And they're also dirty. If you keep them in a coop, it needs regular cleaning. If they're free range, they'll make a mess everywhere. We're still working on the right balance. They're also susceptible to predators. I once lost 40 birds to one mink - all their heads bitten off. If you can care for them properly, they'll actually bring real joy to your farm.

#3 - Llamas. I love llamas. I guess many people wouldn't even have them on this list. They're large, in-charge, and don't kick. They don't eat a whole lot and they have personality. If you can't tell by now, I like a sassy animal; err I should clarify, a SAFE and sassy animal. Their sheared wool is useless and they can spit (nay, throw-up) in your face, but still they're fascinating. In my mind, they're horse "light" and that's just fine by me.

#2 - Dogs. (Image via http://moderndecorho.me) Another no-brainer. The only real question here is if your farm needs an actual FARM dog or do you just have dogs that live on the farm? Trained dogs that sleep with your livestock, like Anatolian Shepherds and Great Pyrenees, can be invaluable in coyote heavy country. We have slacker dogs, that sit on the couch, bark at the pigs, and chomp on the occasional baby bunny. And while they certainly don't work for their keep, the bark of a dog can be a valuable tool on a farm, scaring away predators and alerting you to unusual occurrences in the field.

#1 - Goats. Everyone who's ever owned a goat will agree with me. They are the hams of the barnyard. They can entertain, be affectionate, recognize their names, and stand-up to other animals. They bring sass to the farm. And while chances are they'll escape once or twice (every week), they're easily captured with a handful of grain or an apple. Goats can also produce fiber, milk, and meat. My goats (all nine) eat. And that is all. 

 



 

INTERESTED IN BROADWAY+THRESHER?

October 10, 2012

We're grateful you have an interest in joining our Broadway+Thresher family. There are a few ways to get immediately involved. Our first digital issue will be launched July 1, 2013. We continue to update our blog and look for amazing, talented folks who express our point-of-view.

We are always happy to talk with:

1) People interested in writing or offering photography for the blog and/or magazine. You don't have to be a professional! We would be honored to receive personal photographs of your farm, family, or garden to share with our readers and followers. Interested in learning more? Please contact Andrew at andrew@broadwayandthresher.com or David at david@broadwayandthresher.com.

2) People offering innovative, creative and thoughtful story ideas for Broadway+Thresher. interested in learning more? Please contact Andrew at andrew@broadwayandthresher.com or David at david@broadwayandthresher.com.

3) People offering financial support for Broadway+Thresher. The greater the support we receive, the less ads we may have to feature, and the more opportunities there will be for in-depth articles and blog highlights of amazing folks living the Broadway+Thresher lifestyle. Interested in learning more? Please contact Andrew at andrew@broadwayandthresher.com or David at david@broadwayandthresher.com.

Please continue to check back as we're excited to launch our Kickstarter in January 2013...the thank you gifts offered for donations are going to blow your mind!

 



Issue 6

 

 

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